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Mofongo

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Mofongo is a Puerto Rican dish of fried mashed plantains that I have always wanted to try. Any new way I can eat plantains is welcome to me! There is a large Puerto Rican population here in Springfield, but I have been unable to make it to a restaurant. The beef I made with the mofongo was in the pack I recently received from U.S. Wellness Meats. Normally I would braise a beef bottom round, but the quality was so nice that it came out perfectly as a roast. I just wish I had a bit more time to marinade it.


The marinade was kinda like a mojo. Some onions, garlic, chiles, and orange juice.



Yum, fresh veggies.



This roasted for about 2 hours to medium rare. Use a thermometer!



Soak the cut plantains in cold water until ready to fry.



The veggies that roasted under the beef. Covered in delicious beef juice.







More beef juice added to the sauce.



Meanwhile, I fried the plantains for the mofongo. Here they are in the mixer bowl with the garlic and frying oil.



I had to use my hands to block the plantain chunks from flying around the kitchen.



A chunky starchy mix.



Traditionally mofongo is served either as balls or formed into a bowl to dump a sauce into.



Guacamole and a quick radish salsa.



This came out awesome!



I loved mofongo and cant wait to try it again, perhaps at a Puerto Rican restaurant in the area.




Marinade:
an onion, 5 cloves garlic, some cilantro stems I had laying around, a few dried chiles, cumin, oil, and orange juice. Marinade overnight.

Roast the beef at 325 on a rack over some cut carrots, peppers, garlic, and onions. It will take almost 2 hours. When the roast is done, take the veggies out and blend them with the juice from the beef that has been dripping into them. Then add the puree into some black beans. Use this as a sauce. Slice the beef really thin.

Mofongo:
People normally use bacon or pork skin, but I kept it simple. Fry about 6 plantains in oil in batches until golden. Add to a mixer bowl. Throw about 10 diced garlic cloves into the same oil, then add the oil and garlic to the mixer bowl. Mix with the paddle attachment until chunky and starchy. It shouldn't be smooth like mashed potatoes. Chunky.

Serve with guacamole and some radish salsa. My radish salsa was literally only tomatoes, radish, cilantro, and lime.


8 Comments

I saw this the other day on the food network on "Best Thing I've Ever Ate: Fried Foods" and it intrigued me! Thanks for breaking it down and I think I'll have to give it a try soon!

You're one Mofo of a cook!

Francine and I ate lots of mofongo in PR. Delicious!

Very interesting take on mofongo. Traditionally it is mashed with garlic and chicharones (crunchy pieces of pork) in a pilon (mortar and pestal)and topped with a saucy meat of choice (beef stew, chicken stew, shrimp criolla). Puerto Ricans usually eat sliced avocado, if you ever come across a "florida avocado" usually imported into the US from the dominican republic, that would be the type of avocado you find in Puerto Rico.

First time poster, long time reader...

I first had mofongo in old San Juan, and I completely agree. This needs to land in a much bigger way in the states. I've not found a good mofongo place in Chicago, but have been craving it for the past 2 years since I last had it.

Got some motivation now to hit up Whole Foods for plantains!

If you ever come to Columbus, OH you should go to Costelos. They are one of the few(if only) Puerto Rican restaurants in the city and their food is amazing! Try the Arroz con gandules y pernil. You will really enjoy it! Just like my Abuelita's cooking :D

I'm sorry...I'm a die hard rican and what you made there was just fried mashed plantano con Ajo. Might as well just sliced the plantanos up and and spooned up some of the garlic oil on it. Without the chicharon (pork cracklings) in it...it just not mofongo...at least you tried.

Next time you're in New York go to Malecon on 175th and Broadway. It's up in Washington Heights, but it is SO worth the trip. The food is surprisingly cheap and it is definitely authentic. Domincan food at it's best. I fell in love here. Not with a person, but with Mufungo. Go...Go... GO! Mufungo with chorizo, half a roast chicken, yellow rice, and black beans. Add some icy beer or a pitcher of sangria and you are in true heaven for like...no more than 20 bucks. In Manhattan! Can you believe it?!

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